JSGS Public Workshop: The Relationship Between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous People

On March 7, 2017, the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy will be holding a public workshop on The Relationship Between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous People at the University of Regina campus.  In the spirit of 2017: IPAC’s National Year of Dialogue, we proud to promote this workshop to all IPAC Saskatchewan members interested in learning more about the past, present, and future relationships between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous peoples.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada made the following Call to Action which this workshop supports:

“We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to provide education to public servants on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal-Crown relations.  This will require skills-based training and intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.”

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Post-Secondary Education in Canada: A Response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

On December 12, 2016, Vianne Timmons (President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Regina and Peter Stoicheff (President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Saskatchewan) published a policy brief titled “Post-Secondary Education in Canada: A Response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada” through the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy.

The brief outlines what universities across Canada (in particular the universities of Regina and Saskatchewan) are doing to address the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action dealing with post-secondary issues facing Aboriginal people:

  • “We call upon the federal government to develop with Aboriginal groups a joint strategy to eliminate educational and employment gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians.”
  • “We call upon the federal government to eliminate the discrepancy in federal education funding for First Nations children being educated on reserves and those First Nations children being educated off reserves.”
  • “Provide the necessary funding to post-secondary institutions to educate teachers on how to integrate Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods into classrooms.”
  • “We call upon the federal government, through the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, post-secondary institutions and educators, and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and its partner institutions, to establish a national research program with multi-year funding to advance understanding of reconciliation.”

 


On June 2, 2015, Justice Murray Sinclair released the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s (TRC) 94 Calls to Action.  It was a landmark moment in truth telling and reconciliation between Aboriginal1 and non-Aboriginal people in our country, and one at which many Canadians joined those who had already been mobilized around supporting Aboriginal peoples in Canada.   

Many universities responded to the Calls to Action by making public statements and looking inward at their institutions.  This introspection was necessary and needs to continue. But most importantly, there needs to be action taken on multiple fronts in universities across Canada.

Simply put, one cannot dispute the post-secondary educational gap that exists between non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal youth – a gap that has been caused in many cases by funding deficiencies as well as deeply rooted social and economic issues within Aboriginal communities resulting from Canada’s treatment of Aboriginal people over the past 150 years.  According to the 2006 Census, a significant difference in university completion rates was noted between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal adults.  This had not changed much by the 2011 Census. It reported less than half (48%) of Aboriginal people aged 25 to 64 had a post-secondary qualification. By comparison, about two thirds (65%) of non-Aboriginal people in the same age group had a postsecondary qualification, a difference of 17 percentage points. The policy issue is how universities in Canada can become part of the solution that addresses the deeply rooted social and economic challenges faced by many Aboriginal people.

— Introduction to “Post-Secondary Education in Canada: A Response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada”


 

Upcoming JSGS Events

The Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy is pleased to promote the following events:

JSGS Public Lecture Successes and Challenges: Aboriginal and Northern Engagement in Environmental Remediation Projects Featuring: Dr. Joe Muldoon, Saskatchewan Research Council Vice-Chief Joseph Tsannie, Prince Albert Grand Council Tuesday, January 31, 2017 10:30 am – 12:00 pm For complete event details, please click here.

JSGS Public Workshop How Government Works ~ The Dynamics of Public Policy Development Featuring: Ken Acton, Executive-in-Residence, JSGS Jennifer Ehrmantraut, Director, Executive Education, JSGS Tuesday, February 14, 2017 9:00 am – 4:30 pm For complete event details, please click here.

JSGS Public Lecture Health Care Zombies: Evidence and Values in Canadian Health Care Policy Featuring: Dr. Danielle Martin, Author, Family Doctor and Vice-President, Medical Affairs & Health System Solutions Thursday, February 16, 2017 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm For complete event details, please click here.

JSGS Public Workshop The Relationship Between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous People Featuring: Ron Crowe, Executive-in-Residence, JSGS Cassandra Wajuntah, Associate Director, Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre (IPHRC) Tuesday, March 7, 2017 9:00 am – 4:30 pm For complete event details, please click here.

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 JSGS Policy Brief

Post-Secondary Education in Canada: A Response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Vianne Timmons, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Regina and Peter Stoicheff, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Saskatchewan December 2016

On June 2 2015, Justice Murray Sinclair released the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s (TRC) 94 Calls to Action. It was a landmark moment in truth telling and reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in our country, and one at which many Canadians joined those who had already been mobilized around supporting Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Many universities responded to the Calls to Action by making public statements and looking inward at their institutions. This introspection was necessary and needs to continue. But most importantly, there needs to be action taken on multiple fronts in universities across Canada.

View publication To view past issues, please click here

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Featured JSGS Alumni

Brandon Grant is undaunted by distance, and when asked where he’s from, he’ll say “a little bit of everywhere”. By working with government, he has seen the true benefits of working in public service. Read Brandon’s story here.

Camilla Colpitts has been doing a lot of reading her new new position as Assistant Deputy Minister Policy for Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Agriculture, just like her Johnson Shoyama days. Read Camilla’s story here.

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Become a JSGS Student

Applications for Fall 2017 admission will be accepted up until February 1, 2017. Information about the application process can be found on our website at www.schoolofpublicpolicy.sk.ca, or call for further details on the application process: Regina – John.Bird@uregina.ca / 306-585-5469 Saskatoon – Amy.Hassett@usask.ca / 306-966-1675 JSGS will be hosting an information session coming up on Wednesday, January 18 at First Nations University of Canada in the main Atrium. Join us between 11:00 am – 2:00 pm for pizza and discussion! Watch the events calendar for other upcoming information sessions. Click for details.

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JSGS in the News

Ryan Meili to seek NDP nomination for Saskatoon Meewasin byelectin. Daniel Béland, Saskatoon StarPhoenix, December 15, 2016.

Editorial: Trudeau still faces huge challenges if he wants to help indigenous Canadians. Ken Coates, Ottawa Citizen, December 9, 2016.

Canada’s pro-pipeline First Nations. Ken Coates, BBC News, December 7, 2016.

Viewpoint: Wall right to consider move to a presumed consent law. Daniel Béland and Justin Longo, Saskatoon StarPheonix, December 8, 2016.

Public lecture discusses poverty reduction strategies in Saskatchewan. Cheryl Camillo, CKRM, December 6, 2016.

Saskatchewan’s flawed liquor privatization process favours major chains. Brett Fairbairin, Murray Fulton, Dionnne Pohler. Regina Leader-Post. December 7, 2016.

Follow-up Lecture on the 2016 US Election

JSGS Roundtable: After the Political Storm: Assessing the Effects of the 2016 US Elections

On November 9, 2016 the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy held a roundtable discussion on the results of the 2016 US election.  This discussion is interesting for anyone wanting insights into what may have contributed to the election results and what the future may hold with respect to President-elect Trump’s Administration.

This JSGS Roundtable was moderated by Dr. Murray Fulton and features:

  • Dr. Daniel Béland – Professor and Canada Research Chair in Public Policy, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, and Associate Member, Department of Sociology, University of Saskatchewan
  • Professor Cheryl Camillo – Assistant Professor, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina
  • Dr. John. C. Courtney – Senior Policy Fellow, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University Saskatchewan; Professor Emeritus, College of Arts and Science, Department of Political Studies
  • Dale Eisler – Senior Policy Fellow, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy; Editor, JSGS Policy Brief